Othello true love and self love essay

He is portrayed by every character as an honest and trustworthy person. Yet, as the audience is well informed by the end of the first act, he appears to be quite the opposite. Throughout the entire play he turns all his friends, who trust him most, against each other.

Othello true love and self love essay

Relationships in Othello Independent. Here's a run down of the key relationships in Othello: Othello and Iago - 'Frenemies' 'Keep your friends close but your enemies closer! This means that they have a close military relationship. However, the personal relationship between Othello and Iago is much more complex.

From the SparkNotes Blog

Othello trusts Iago totally as Iago has a reputation in Venice for being very honest: However, Iago despises Othello and makes it his personal mission to destroy him: Several strokes of good fortune the handkerchief etc help Iago keep Othello on side until the murder of Desdamona but Othello true love and self love essay it is his genius for manipulation and trickery that ensures his success.

Desdemona and Othello - True Love? In marrying a 'Moor', Desdemona flies in the face of convention and faces familial and societal criticism for her bold choice. Her father is shocked and dismayed: She fell in love with his stories of valour; "These things to hear would Desdemona seriously incline".

This also shows that she is not a passive, submissive character in that she decided she wanted him and she pursued him.

Othello true love and self love essay

On the subject of her relationship with Othello, Desdemona says: That I did love the Moor to live with him, My downright violence and storm of fortunes May trumpet to the world: I saw Othello's visage in his mind, And to his honour and his valiant parts Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate.

While Othello appears confident of her love for him in Act 1 deep down he is insecure in the relationship. He can't quite believe how happy he is that she loves him: If it were now to die, 'Twere now to be most happy; for I fear, My soul hath her content so absolute That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.

When Iago starts making vague suggestions of Cassio's untrustworthy nature Othello's confidence is knocked sideways very rapidly: This would point to him being more worried about his hurt pride than about the fact that she might not love him.

Desdemona, unlike her husband, is not insecure, even when called a 'whore' she remains loyal to him and resolves to love him despite his misunderstanding of her; she is resolute and tenacious in the face of adversity.

Her love for Othello is unwaning: My love doth so approve him That even his stubbornness, his checks, his frowns - Prithee unpin me - have grace and favour in them.

She bids Othello to do the sensible thing and ask Cassio how he obtained the handkerchief but this is too rational for Othello who has already ordered his murder.

Iago's Soliloquies - New York Essays

Even as Desdemona faces her death, she asks Emilia to commend her to her 'kind lord'. She remains in love with him knowing that he is responsible for her death.

In his final speech Othello claims that he was "one that loved not wisely but too well" and it is clear that his feelings regarding Desdamona were extremely passionate and overwhelming. Whether one lays all the blame for the tragedy at Iago's door, however, or holds Othello responsible is a matter for each individual audience member as they watch the play.

Iago and Emilia - An Unhappy Marriage The relationship between Iago and Emilia is not that of a strong and equal tie of love which we expect to find existing between man and wife. When she exposes his scheme he kills her without a moment's hesitation and shocks the people who witness it: She steals the handkerchief in order to make him happy and perhaps strengthen their relationship: I'll have the work ta'en out, And give't lago: Her character is somewhat tarnished by her association with Iago but she seems self-aware enough to realise that this is the case:Othello again says, “I know, Iago thy honesty and love ” when asking Iago to tell him who started the drunken brawl between Cassio nd Roderigo [II.

iii. ]. Cassio says “Good night, honest Iago” before leaving after the drunken brawl [II. iii. ]. The second possibility is that Othello and Desdemona have a true love, and First Senator's question defines true love. Love is obtained by asking nicely ("request") for everything from a moment alone to a hand in marriage.

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Othello: True Love and Self-love The William Shakespeare tragic play Othello manifests the virtue of love in all its variegated types through the assorted good and bad characters interacting with each other. Self-love in Othello is the inordinate ego, or selfishness. This ego is the force that motivates these three characters to risk, and in Othello's case, .

By Elaine Dobbyn

Othello's rage at Desdemona's infidelity has nothing to do with his love for her; rather, for him, it signals the destruction of his own identity as a successful and loved man. In Othello, a man's reputation seems to hinge on military duty and public behavior, while a woman's identity often hinges on .

Free Essay: Othello: True Love and Self-love The William Shakespeare tragic play Othello manifests the virtue of love in all its variegated types through the.

SparkNotes: Othello: Important Quotations Explained